Marquis

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As an Amtgard title, appears in the order of precedence, just above Count and just below Duke.

Award scroll created for Squire Squire by Venus

Contents

Definition from Wikipedia

A marquess (English spelling) or marquis (North American English and French spelling) is a nobleman of hereditary rank in various European monarchies and some of their colonies.

The original title was Margrave, or rather its original in German, Markgraf, with a few equivalents in other languages in use in parts of the Holy Roman Empire (such as Markgraaf in Dutch, Margravio in Italian). The English word derives via the Middle French marquis (feminine, marquise) from Old French Marchis from Medieval Latin marca "frontier, frontier territory" - also seen in the Germanic word for 'border' (mark) - which in English became march, plural marches. The French form marquis, recorded in English since 1300, is still sometimes used (especially in Scotland), though marquess is now the preferred British usage. They were originally counts who were granted extra powers because they guarded border areas. This gave them precedence over other counts (in England, earls). This origin is still evident in the German language (Mark+graf=March+count). In Venice, so many of the nobles in the Libro d'Oro styled themselves marchese by 1529, that when Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor, entered Venice that year, he lost patience with the distinctions among his recent, desultory enemies: Vos omnes marchiones appello, he announced ("I call all of you marchesi"), to the delight of a contemporary Florentine. This story was revived when Genoa joined the Kingdom of Italy in 1861: all the patricians of Genoa were declared marchesi al cognome ("marchesi by name"—"only" being implied).

How do you become one?

It varies from Kingdom to Kingdom.

In Goldenvale and the Celestial Kingdom the Title of Marquis is given for serving at least one term each in the offices of Regent, Champion and Prime Minster.

Variations

Germanic languages

Danish Markis /Markise Dutch Markies, Markgraaf /Markiezin, Markgravin German Markgraf, Marquis /Markgräfin, Marquise Icelandic Markgreifi /Markgreifynja Luxemburgish Marquis /Marquise Norwegian (only awarded to a few Danish families) Markis /Markise Old English: þegn/Hlǣfdiġe Swedish Markis, Markgreve /Markise, Markgrevinna

Romance languages

Latin Marchio Catalan Marquès /Marquesa French Marquis, Margrave/Marquise Italian Margravio, Marchese /Marchesa Monegasque Marchise /Marchisa Portuguese Margrave, Marquês /Marquesa Rhaeto-Romanic Marchis /Marchesa Romanian Marchiz /Marchiză Spanish Marqués /Marquesa

Slavonic and Baltic languages
  • Belarusian Markiz /Markiza
  • Bulgarian Markiz /Markiza
  • Croatian Markiz /Markiza
  • Czech Markýz /Markýza
  • Latvian Marķīzs /Marķīze
  • Lithuanian Markizas /Markizė
  • Macedonian Markiz /Markiza
  • Polish Margrabia, Markiz /Margrabina, Markiza
  • Russian Markiz /Markiza
  • Serbian Markiz /Markiza
  • Slovak Markíz /Markíza
  • Slovene Markiz /Markiza
  • Ukrainian Markiz /Markiza
Other languages
  • Albanian: Markiz /Markizë
  • Estonian: Rajakrahv /Rajakrahvinna or simply Markii/Markiis
  • Finnish: Rajakreivi /Rajakreivitär or simply Markiisi /Markiisitar
  • Greek (modern): Markisios /Markisia
  • Hungarian: Őrgróf (Márki) / Őrgrófnő (Márkinő) / Őrgrófné (consort of an Őrgróf)
  • Maltese: Markiż /MarkiżaGermanic languages
  • Danish Markis /Markise
  • Dutch Markies, Markgraaf /Markiezin, Markgravin
  • German Markgraf, Marquis /Markgräfin, Marquise
  • Icelandic Markgreifi /Markgreifynja
  • Luxemburgish Marquis /Marquise
  • Norwegian (only awarded to a few Danish families) Markis /Markise
  • Old English: þegn/Hlǣfdiġe
  • Swedish Markis, Markgreve /Markise, Markgrevinna
Romance languages
  • Latin Marchio
  • Catalan Marquès /Marquesa
  • French Marquis, Margrave/Marquise
  • Italian Margravio, Marchese /Marchesa
  • Monegasque Marchise /Marchisa
  • Portuguese Margrave, Marquês /Marquesa
  • Rhaeto-Romanic Marchis /Marchesa
  • Romanian Marchiz /Marchiză
  • Spanish Marqués /Marquesa
Slavonic and Baltic languages
  • Belarusian Markiz /Markiza
  • Bulgarian Markiz /Markiza
  • Croatian Markiz /Markiza
  • Czech Markýz /Markýza
  • Latvian Marķīzs /Marķīze
  • Lithuanian Markizas /Markizė
  • Macedonian Markiz /Markiza
  • Polish Margrabia, Markiz /Margrabina, Markiza
  • Russian Markiz /Markiza
  • Serbian Markiz /Markiza
  • Slovak Markíz /Markíza
  • Slovene Markiz /Markiza
  • Ukrainian Markiz /Markiza
Other languages
  • Albanian: Markiz /Markizë
  • Estonian: Rajakrahv /Rajakrahvinna or simply Markii/Markiis
  • Finnish: Rajakreivi /Rajakreivitär or simply Markiisi /Markiisitar
  • Greek (modern): Markisios /Markisia
  • Hungarian: Őrgróf (Márki) / Őrgrófnő (Márkinő) / Őrgrófné (consort of an Őrgróf)
  • Maltese: Markiż /Markiża
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