Armor

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From the Rulebook

Armor is period protective gear which grants an advantage to the wearer in combat by protecting them from physical blows. Armor can be based in history or fantasy, but must use approximately period materials and offer similar protection to that granted by historical armor in order to receive full value.

Armor Combat Rules

Armor is rated by its ability to stop Wounds and is referred to as Armor Points. Armor with an Armor Point value not allowed to a Player Class may be worn for the highest value allowed to the Player Class with the permission of the reeve.

Any hit to armor only affects the location struck unless otherwise noted.
Example: Hitting the sleeve of a chainmail shirt will only affect the arm location.
There are four possible mechanics involved with counting blows to armor:

  1. A hit to armor from any weapon will remove one Armor Point from the location hit.
  2. A hit to armor from a weapon, Magic Ball, etc with the Armor Breaking Special Effect will immediately remove all Armor Points from the location struck if the location struck currently has three or less Armor Points. If the armor currently has four or more Armor Points then the armor has one Armor Point removed as per normal.

Example: Armor with 4 points is struck by a weapon with Armor Breaking.
The armor loses an Armor Point at the location struck. The armor is struck again in the same location which now has 3 points. The Armor Points at that location are reduced to zero and the wearer is unharmed unless otherwise noted.

  1. A hit to armor from a weapon, Magic Ball, etc with the Armor Destroying ability reduces the armor to zero points in the location struck. The wearer is unharmed unless otherwise noted.
  2. Contacts to armor from objects which do not fall into the above categories have no effect on the armor and pass through to the location underneath unless otherwise noted.


Armor with no remaining Armor Points no longer interacts with hits from weapons, Magic Balls, etc.

Armor only protects the area that it covers.
Example: You have armor on the front of your leg, but a gap on your thigh, and are struck in the area left open by the gap. You are wounded and the armor itself takes no damage.

Armor present on a wounded hit location will continue to function and stop blows as per normal. This does not exempt wounded arms from the requirement to be kept out of combat.

Armor worn under garb must be partially visible, and must be announced if asked.

Armor Construction Rules

  1. The Monarch, Champion and Guildmaster of Reeves rate armor.
  2. Armor that is of mixed values across the same area will be averaged based on the percentage of each type of coverage of the area, rounding fractions to the nearest whole number.

Example: An arm with a Plate bracer (5 AP) covering 30% of the arm and a Chainmail sleeve (3 AP) covering 70% of the arm will result in an armor value of (.3*5) + (.7*3) = 3.6 = 4 AP across the entire location.

  1. Armor should weigh close to actual historical standards to receive full value.
  2. Straps and other such material that hold your armor on do not count as part of the armor, for either coverage or averaging purposes, unless they are specifically built as such.

Example: The leather strap across your back holding on your steel breastplate does not protect you from hits.

  1. A gambeson must be at least equivalent to Cloth armor. A gambeson must be worn under all armor on a hit location in order to give a bonus. A gambeson which extends past the area covered by the armor it is supporting may be either treated as garb or averaged as Cloth armor at the discretion of the wearer on a per-location basis.
  2. All armor must be safe, with no protruding edges that could injure someone.
  3. All corners on any armor that will not deform under contact must come to a point no sharper than the radius of a penny.
  4. Armor that is made from synthetic materials such as vinyl, plastic, etc may be used but may never be rated higher than 2 Armor Points.
  5. Armor is considered to be of the type it most closely resembles.

Example: Leather with small plates or studs attached at 1” intervals is still leather armor, it is not butted plate with a negative modifier.

  1. Armor that is initially rated as zero points does not count as armor. Armor that has been depleted continues to be considered armor, but does not continue to stop wounds until restored.

Armor Types and Modifiers

Armors not listed that are made from authentic materials should be rated as their closest construction analogue in terms of materials and appearance. Obviously modern materials and obviously modern protective gear such as sports shin pads and hockey chest pads may never be considered as armor; such materials and items may be used as a base for armor, but the final product must have the appearance of actual armor rather than modern protective gear. Wholly inappropriate materials such as cardboard, tinfoil, and foam may never be considered as armor.

Armor listed under Armor Types show the minimum/maximum ranges for which a piece of armor will receive base points. Armor may also receive Armor Point bonuses and penalties. These modifiers may not result in a total net bonus of greater than +1, unless otherwise noted.
Example: Chainmail may be heavy weave, heavy gauge, riveted aluminum, and would have modifiers of -1 for lighter materials, -1 for less protective materials, +1 for riveted, +1 for heavy gauge, and +1 for heavy weave for a total of 4 points.

General Modifiers

These modifiers may be applied to any type armor as appropriate. See the description of the specific armor types below for specific modifiers.

Inferior Construction

Up to two points can be deducted for armor that is substantially less protective or durable than standard construction techniques.
Example: shoddy workmanship, larger ring diameter, lighter gauge, etc.

Non-Standard Metal

One point is deducted for metal armor that is less protective or lighter than steel.
Example: titanium, bronze, etc. Metal which is both less protective and lighter has one point deducted for each.
Example: Aluminum.

Inferior Appearance

Up to two points can be deducted for inferior appearance, unrelated to the construction techniques used.
Example: obviously unfinished armor, visible inauthentic materials, or tarnished/poorly maintained armor. This does not apply if the armor is intentionally made to look shoddy for an in-game purpose, such as monster/barbarian armor. Armor may receive this penalty regardless of construction quality.

Superior Construction

Up to one point may be awarded for armor that substantially exceeds the defensive properties of the standard materials or uses superior construction techniques such as fluting, heavier thickness/gauge materials, hardening, smaller ring diameter, etc. May not be awarded in combination with the same specific armor type modifier.
Example: A +1 cannot be awarded twice for fluting on Articulated Plate.

Superior Appearance

Up to one point may be awarded for exceptional appearance unrelated to the construction techniques used.
Examples include: Extensive and well-done tooling of leather, appealing addition of studs and/or rings, etching of metal, gilding, blueing, etc. Armor receiving a modifier for Inferior Construction is not eligible for this bonus.

Helm

Up to one point may be awarded to the worn torso armor for wearing a helm on the head. The helm must cover at least 50% of the area from the base of the neck upwards. The helm must be of a historical or swords and sorcery fantasy design. The helm bonus is negated if the helm is removed.

There are two types of helms: Light Helms, and Heavy Helms. Light Helms (e.g. arming cap, coif, etc.) must meet the requirements of at least Strong Leather or Chainmail armor. The torso armor bonus received for a Light Helm may not exceed the maximum value for the armor type. Heavy Helms (e.g. Spangenhelm, Crusader Helm) must meet the requirements of Plate armor and additionally be made of at least 16 gauge metal. The torso armor bonus received from a Heavy Helm may allow the wearer to exceed the maximum value for the armor type.

Armor Types

Synthetic

Material such as vinyl, naugahyde, ABS plastic, etc.

Armor Points

Base Armor Points: 1
Maximum Armor Points: 2

Requirements

Must be a minimum of 1/8” thick. Must not be obviously synthetic in appearance.

Armor Specific Modifiers

Heavy Gauge: +1

Material is at least 1/4” thick either as a single piece or through the permanent attachment of several layers.

Cloth

Cloth armor.jpg

This fabric armor offers minimal protection from penetration and impact.

Armor Points

Base Armor Points: 1 Maximum Armor Points: 2

Requirements

Must be a minimum of 1/16” thick when fully compressed. Must not be easily mistaken as regular garb.

Armor Specific Modifiers

None


Light Leather

Light leather.jpg

This animal skin or fur armor offers minimal protection from penetration and impact.

Armor Points

Base Armor Points: 1
Maximum Armor Points: 2

Requirements

Must be a minimum of 1/16” thick.

Armor Specific Modifiers

Cuirboilli: +1

The leather has been made rigid through boiling, wax impregnation, lacquering, or a similar process.

Gambeson: +1

The armor is worn over a Gambeson.

Strong Leather

Strong leather.jpg

This thick leather armor provides some amount of protection from impact and penetration.

Armor Points

Base Armor Points: 2
Maximum Armor Points: 3

Requirements

Must be a minimum of 3/16” thick.

Armor Specific Modifiers

Cuirboilli: +1

The leather has been made rigid through boiling, wax impregnation, lacquering, or a similar process.

Gambeson: +1

The armor is worn over a Gambeson.

Heavy Gauge: +1

The leather is at least 1/4” thick either as a single piece or through the permanent attachment of several layers.

Chainmail

Chainmail.jpg

This flexible armor is comprised of a tight weave of interlocked metal rings that provides good protection against penetration and some protection from impact. The standard weave for chainmail is 4-in-1 European. Weaves containing less metal qualify as inferior construction.

Armor Points

Base Armor Points: 3
Maximum Armor Points: 4

Requirements

Minimum four-in-one standard European weave.
Minimum 1.58mm (16 gauge) diameter round steel rings.
Flat rings must be at least 1.22mm (18 gauge) thick along their thinnest axis.
Maximum ring inner diameter of 3/8”.

Armor Specific Modifiers

Heavy Gauge: +1

The rings are at least 1.9mm (14 gauge) in diameter. Flat rings must be at least 1.58mm (16 gauge) thick along their thinnest axis.

Gambeson: +1

This armor is worn over a Gambeson.

Dense Weave: +1

The weave is denser than than the minimum.

Solid Rings: +1

All of the rings are permanently joined so that they may not separate. Examples are riveting, welding, or solid-cast rings.

Butted Plates

Butted plates.jpg

Armor comprised of numerous steel plates butted together within sewn pockets, attached to a backing, linked by cord or chain, or by some other method. This armor is flexible with numerous seams and joints between plates. This armor will deform locally when struck rather than spreading out impact over a large area. It provides fair protection against both penetration and impact.

Armor Points

Base Armor Points: 3
Maximum Armor Points: 4

Requirements

Plates must be at least 1.22mm (18 gauge) steel. Plates must be spaced no more than 1/8” apart. Plates must cover at least 90% of the exposed area of the armor.

Armor Specific Modifiers

Heavy Gauge: +1

The plates are at least 1.58mm (16 gauge).

Heavy Backing: +1

The plates are attached to a backing of Strong Leather.

Gambeson: +1

This armor is worn over a Gambeson.

Rigid: +1

The plates are attached to a rigid backing in such a way as to create armor which does not deform locally on impact.

No Gaps: +1

The plates are attached in such a fashion as to provide a continuous layer without gaps between plates.

Scale

Scale.jpg

This armor is created by overlapping many metal plates which are attached along only one edge. Individual scales are not held into rigid contact with the others, thus providing less protection from penetration and impact than other overlapping metal armors. Scale offers fair penetration and impact resistance.

Armor Points

Base Armor Points: 3
Maximum Armor Points: 4

Requirements

Scales must be at least 1.22mm (18 gauge) steel. Scales must overlap by at least 10%. The backing must not be visible through the scales.

Armor Specific Modifiers

Fluted: +1

Each plate has been fluted for additional strength and rigidity.

Heavy Gauge: +1

Each plate is at least 1.58mm (16 gauge).

Rigid: +1

Each scale is attached to neighboring scales in such a fashion as to create a rigid shell rather than individually mobile scales.

Gambeson: +1

This armor is worn over a Gambeson.

Lamellar

Lamellar.jpg

This armor is constructed from numerous plates connected to each other in an overlapping fashion by cord, chain link, or similar methods. Unlike scales the plates of this type of armor are firmly connected to each other in such a way that they resist penetration. Lamellar armor differs from other rigid metal armors in that it is not shaped to fit the body or articulated; mobility is instead provided by the small amount of flex and slack in the attachment between the individual plates. This armor provides good protection from both impact and penetration.

Armor Points

Base Armor Points: 4
Maximum Armor Points: 5 (6 if both the Superior Overlap and Heavy Gauge modifiers are used.)

Requirements

Plates must be at least 1.22mm (18 gauge) steel. Plates must overlap by at least 10%. No backing is used for support; plates must connect directly to each other.

Armor Specific Modifiers

Fluted: +1

Each plate has been fluted for additional strength and rigidity.

Heavy Gauge: +1

Each plate is at least 1.58mm (16 gauge).

Superior Overlap: +1

75% of plates overlap at least 25% of their surface area.

Gambeson: +1

This armor is worn over a Gambeson.

Brigandine

Brigandine.jpg

This armor is constructed from numerous shaped and fitted overlapping metal plates solidly connected along one edge to an exterior shell of heavy cloth (such as canvas, denim, or velvet) in such a way that when worn all plates are held together firmly without any gaps between them and follow the general contours of the body. This armor provides good protection against both impact and penetration.

Armor Points

Base Armor Points: 4
Maximum Armor Points: 5 (6 if both the Superior Overlap and Large Plates modifiers are used.)

Requirements

Plates must be at least 1.22mm (18 gauge) steel. At least 75% of plates must overlap by at least 10% of their surface area. Plates need only be attached along one edge but must be held firmly against each other when the armor is worn. Plates must be shaped and fitted so as to follow the general contours of the wearer.

Armor Specific Modifiers

Heavy Gauge: +1

Each plate is at least 1.58mm (16 gauge).

Superior Overlap: +1

75% of plates overlap at least 25% of their surface area.

Gambeson: +1

This armor is worn over a Gambeson.

Large Plates: +1

At least 50% of the surface area of the armor is protected by individual large plates rather than numerous smaller plates. Each large plate must be at least 10% of the total size of the hit location.

Plate

Plate.jpg

Plate armor is the pinnacle of medieval armor and offers excellent protection against both impact and penetration. Plate armor armor forms a solid metal shell over the protected areas that spreads impact over a large surface area to mitigate concussive force. The individual metal pieces of plate armor are shaped and fitted to articulate together and follow the contours of the body. Plate armor will not deform locally when struck, but will instead behave as a single contiguous whole.

Armor Points

Base Armor Points: 5
Maximum Armor Points: 6

Requirements

Metal used must be at least 1.22mm (18 gauge) steel. At least 75% of the protected area must be covered by individual plates which are large relative to the hit location protected; Plate is large individual contiguous pieces of metal connected together to form a whole, not a large number of smaller plates. Each plate must be firmly attached to all neighboring plates by strapping or metal-on-metal articulation in such a way as to form a rigid shell when worn. Armor may still be flexible where necessary for mobility.

Armor Specific Modifiers

Fluted: +1

The armor has been fluted for additional strength and rigidity.

Heavy Gauge: +1

Metal used is at least 1.58mm (16 gauge).

Metal Articulations: +1

Articulations and connections between plates are metal-on-metal rather than metal-on-leather.

Gambeson: +1

This armor is worn over a Gambeson.

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